Media

Not Liable: Law Schools Should Not Be Blamed For The Articling Crisis And The Sometimes Bleak Situation Of Young Lawyers

The Problem is not Law School. The Problem is that Law School is Buffered by Four Years Getting a Useless Undergraduate Degree.

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The roots of the articling crisis

| Law Times

Since the Great Recession of 2007-2009, there has been a lot of media commentary blaming the sometimes-bleak economic prospects of young lawyers on law schools. In this coverage, you’ll also hear complaints about the lack of utility of a law degree, the high tuition for the law school and the debt it creates, as well as the competitiveness of the job market for lawyers upon graduation.

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Carding in Toronto: It isn’t random and it is fundamentally illegal

In a June 18th article in the Globe and Mail Mayor John Tory defined the practice of carding Thursday as ‘the arbitrary stopping of people for reasons unrelated to any criminal or lawful investigation, and recording information from those people and storage of that information in a database of innocent people over a long-term basis.’ Using that definition, he said, ‘I believe today will represent a definitive end to carding.’”

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Traffic stops: what should you do when police pull you over?

| CBC

Some high-profile, controversial incidents have brought the issue of police traffic stops to light recently, including the deaths of Jermaine Carby in Brampton, Ont., and Sandra Bland in Texas. Police shot Carby after a traffic stop, while Bland was found dead in a jail cell three days after being detained after a traffic stop in Texas.

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Can a person kill pre-emptively in self-defence?

The Ontario Bar Association just published an article I wrote on a subject that I have been interested in for years: pre-emptive killings in self-defence.

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Can an Unsympathetic Accused Kill “Pre-Emptively” Under the New Self Defence Provisions?

| Ontario Bar Association

Ryan Handlarski reviews the defence of self-defence prior to and post the recent amendments to the Criminal Code. He focusses on a difficult area of the law – an area that cuts to the core of our duties to defend the rights of innocent individuals – no matter how unsavoury they may be. Mr. Handlarski makes a convincing argument that the law has changed and for the better.

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